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Mackinac in the War of 1812

Since the Treaty of Ghent was signed in December of 1814, I decided to write about what happened in Michigan during the war. When I started my research, I learned there was a lot more to report than I had anticipated, so this month, I will just focus on the Mackinac area during the war of 1812.

Mackinac in the War of 18122020-01-15T13:01:06-05:00

Michigan women brave the Civil War

The American Civil War was a conflict that affected most American citizens. More than 620,000 soldiers lost their lives to wounds and disease. Unfortunately, civilians were not exempt from dying either. It was a defining moment in American history and Michigan played a significant role as 90,000 Michigan men served in the Union forces. That was about

Michigan women brave the Civil War2020-03-04T15:12:54-05:00

Fire ravages Michigan, not just Chicago, in 1871

For most historians, October 8, 1871, will stick out as the day of the Great Chicago Fire. The blaze in the Windy City killed approximately 300 people, destroyed 3.3 square miles of the city, and left over 100,000 residents homeless. Many people believe the Michigan connection to the Chicago fire is limited to the fact that lumber

Fire ravages Michigan, not just Chicago, in 18712020-03-04T15:06:51-05:00

Meet Detroit’s second founder: Father Gabriel Richard

Religion. Morality. Knowledge. These are precepts to which Fr. Gabriel Richard lived throughout his entire life. He is a man not often read about in the Michigan history books, which is quite a shame, as he did much to help the early settlers in Michigan. Father Gabriel is also known by some as the second founder of Detroit. If

Meet Detroit’s second founder: Father Gabriel Richard2020-03-04T15:07:30-05:00

Michigan’s first mysterious ship disappearance

Shipwrecks have been a danger to sailors, merchants and explorers since biblical times. Ships sailing on the Great Lakes are no exception. Over 6,000 have sunk to the bottom of the five lakes costing 30,000 people their lives. The Edmund Fitzgerald, which sank in 1971 may be the most famous; however, one of the first recorded shipwrecks in

Michigan’s first mysterious ship disappearance2020-03-04T15:08:20-05:00

Labor movement has deep roots in Michigan

These days for most people, Labor Day means a last long look at summer. Jazz fills the air in Detroit and thousands of people take a stunningly beautiful stroll across the Mackinac Bridge. Boats leave their docks with swimmers aboard and skiers behind. Barbecues and picnics can be found in backyards and parks around the state. People

Labor movement has deep roots in Michigan2020-03-04T15:08:54-05:00

Walking through 300 years of history at The Henry Ford

July is the month that we, as a nation, celebrate our birthday and our history. Though Independence Day is usually known for family, cookouts and fireworks, we must always remember the history behind the holiday. One Michigan man, Henry Ford, was often thinking and learning about our nation’s past and he collected many items to help preserve

Walking through 300 years of history at The Henry Ford2020-03-04T14:57:32-05:00

The most unbelievable true story of Pontiac’s Rebellion

Every Memorial Day Weekend, a group of individuals dressed as American Indians from the upper part of Michigan gather in front of Fort Michilimackinac in Mackinaw City to play baggataway, which is an early version of lacrosse. The game is carefully scripted. Many spectators gather, some of whom are dressed as American Indian women and children.The reenactors

The most unbelievable true story of Pontiac’s Rebellion2020-03-04T14:58:28-05:00

Michigan: first in and first out of Prohibition

The month of May marks the anniversary of Michigan Prohibition, which began on May 1, 1917. “But wait," say those of you who know your Constitutional History. “Prohibition was the 18th Amendment and that took effect on January 17, 1920.” Well, my friends, the state of Michigan, which is now home to Beer City USA, passed a prohibition

Michigan: first in and first out of Prohibition2020-03-04T14:59:20-05:00

Bless you boys: a history of the Detroit Tigers

April. It is officially spring, and there is much going on in the world of sports. In hockey, the Stanley Cup Playoffs begin, as do the NBA playoffs, and of course one NCAA basketball team will experience ‘One Shining Moment’ on April 8 and become National Champions. However, if you’re like me, when I think of sports

Bless you boys: a history of the Detroit Tigers2020-03-04T15:00:04-05:00

Remembering Michigan native and national hero Roger Chaffee

January 27, 1967 started just like any other day for most Americans. There was much excitement through the nation as three men prepared for another mission in space. The three astronauts knew that in a month, their mission could make history. Unfortunately, they did make history, but were not able to enjoy their fame or accolades. Grand

Remembering Michigan native and national hero Roger Chaffee2020-03-04T14:50:07-05:00

The ‘Frostbitten Convention’ that secured our beloved Upper Peninsula

This time of year often brings some heated college football rivalries, and none more nationally-known than the University of Michigan versus Ohio State University. It seems as though these two colleges, and by extension, these two states, have a deep animosity toward one another. When did this start? How did it happen? Well, readers, I have a theory, and it goes

The ‘Frostbitten Convention’ that secured our beloved Upper Peninsula2020-03-04T14:51:11-05:00

How a Michigan man became a WWII veteran of two countries

With this being the month of November, I thought it appropriate to write an article about a hometown veteran. To me, the story of Joseph Beyrle is made for Hollywood. Joe was an American soldier who was given accolades by both the United States and the Soviet Union. He was a hero who deserves to have his

How a Michigan man became a WWII veteran of two countries2020-03-04T14:40:02-05:00

5 ways to support military heroes past and present

More than 2,000 Michiganders are actively serving in the military today, and 658,469 of our neighbors are veterans, according to the US Department of Veteran Affairs. They deserve our gratitude and support. Here are some simple ways you can express your gratitude this month and throughout the year. Schedule a Pickup Spring is an excellent time to

5 ways to support military heroes past and present2020-03-04T14:40:23-05:00

MI Women’s Hall of Fame seeks medallion redesign

Calling all female artists who have a passion for history and equal rights. The Michigan Women's Hall of Fame is looking for a talented local woman to create a new medallion. Eventually, the new design will be used to commemorate future inductees. In fact, the hall of fame medallion design that is selected will be on a

MI Women’s Hall of Fame seeks medallion redesign2021-08-25T00:10:42-04:00

Honoring Michigan’s first female conservation officer

Huldah Neal, shown here in her later years, was the nation’s first female conservation officer. (Photo courtesy of the Traverse Area District Library) In 1897, Huldah Neal became a deputy game warden for Grand Traverse County. Thereby cementing her little-known legacy as the first female conservation officer in the United States. This is according to

Honoring Michigan’s first female conservation officer2021-08-24T23:30:17-04:00
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