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Musket wound forever changes medical history

Two men working together led to incredible scientific discovery in the early 1800s. One was highly educated, a former teacher, and a trained physician. While the other was an illiterate voyageur who worked a hard, physical job until an accident changed his life. This incident would lead to one of the most amazing studies of the human

Musket wound forever changes medical history2022-06-01T00:07:13-04:00

A history of what was Michigan Agricultural College

Michigan has long been a farming community. In the mid-1800s, it was determined that institutes of higher education that focused on teaching practical agriculture, science, military science, and engineering would be productive. This was inspired, in part, by the industrial revolution and changing social classes of the entire country. In 1850, the Michigan Constitution decided to create

A history of what was Michigan Agricultural College2022-05-31T18:36:17-04:00

U of M researchers led the fight to eradicate polio

Poliomyelitis. No one has been diagnosed with it originating in the United States since 1979, yet people still suffer from the effects. Before the 21st Century, the disease, more commonly known as polio, was dreaded. Most cases occurred in children aged six months to four years old. The fear of this disease caused many people to stay

U of M researchers led the fight to eradicate polio2022-04-07T19:56:44-04:00

What building was considered Michigan’s first skyscraper?

When people hear the term skyscrapers, they usually think of the Empire State Building or the Willis Tower. These properties shoot up over a thousand feet, and stand out among the majestic skylines of New York City and Chicago. However, the early buildings that were considered skyscrapers, while impressive and beautiful, were only between ten and twenty

What building was considered Michigan’s first skyscraper?2022-02-22T01:26:05-05:00

Christmas tree ships once sailed the Great Lakes

Christmas trees are a popular symbol and decoration for the holiday season. The tradition began in Germany and was brought to America as early as the 1830s by German settlers. They were made popular in 1846 by Queen Victoria of England and her family. Michigan and nearby Chicago had many German settlers living there in the late

Christmas tree ships once sailed the Great Lakes2021-12-02T15:59:47-05:00

Disaster at the Barnes-Hecker Mine

We may not often think of how important mining has been to the history of Michigan. When we think of major economies in our state, we think of the automobile industry and our lumber companies. However, Michigan has four important mining ranges. First, there's what's known as Copper Country in Keweenaw, Houghton and Ontonagon counties. Then, the

Disaster at the Barnes-Hecker Mine2021-11-05T06:41:11-04:00

Sojourner Truth – what a woman she was

Michigan is home to many notable individuals, men and women, of all ages. One woman in particular was not only important to our state, but also to the entire nation. She was so remarkable that she was inducted into both the National Women’s Hall of Fame and the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame. Sojourner Truth was an

Sojourner Truth – what a woman she was2021-10-01T09:02:41-04:00

How the Mackinac Bridge was built

I took a drive up to Mackinaw City this past weekend. Along the way I saw numerous signs warning travelers that the Mackinac Bridge would be closed on Labor Day from 6:30am to 12:00 pm for the bridge walk. Not only that, but I was able to cross the bridge four times that weekend. It made me

How the Mackinac Bridge was built2021-09-03T07:19:54-04:00

Could Dan Seavey be the meanest pirate on the Great Lakes?

Though pirates are criminals, usually quite brutal and violent, their lives are often studied, esteemed, and shown as an exciting lifestyle in many stories and Hollywood movies, from Captain Hook in Once Upon a Time to Captain Jack Sparrow. Many of the well-known pirates sailed tropical seas, but the Great Lakes has had their fair share of

Could Dan Seavey be the meanest pirate on the Great Lakes?2021-08-03T01:34:28-04:00

Was there once a king of Beaver Island?

Beaver Island is the third largest island in Michigan and has been a popular vacation tourist destination since the 1860s. It is well known for its beautiful beaches, awesome forests, recreational harbors and its isolation from the mainland. In addition to this, did you know that it has a colorful and unique history? This is especially true

Was there once a king of Beaver Island?2021-07-24T12:02:55-04:00

Traverse City becomes the nation’s cherry capital

Most Michigan tourist towns have a frontier history, and Traverse City is no different. The Cherry Capital of the World is young compared to other Michigan cities, like Mackinaw, Detroit and Grand Rapids, but it still holds a rich history. I recently brought my eighth grade students to the city for a field trip and was reminded

Traverse City becomes the nation’s cherry capital2021-06-03T16:35:13-04:00

Women’s baseball teams find a place in league of their own

It’s spring, and that means getting out and playing sports. While looking around at all the active ball fields, I can’t help but think of the classic line, “There’s no crying in baseball.” Many people know the quote. It comes from the timeless 1992 movie, A League of Their Own and tells the story of the All-American

Women’s baseball teams find a place in league of their own2021-05-07T07:22:33-04:00

Michigan’s second, yet only, National Park

Michigan is home to many beautiful national landmarks, such as the National Lakeshores of Sleeping Bear Dunes and Pictured Rocks and our three National Forests, Huron-Manistee, Hiawatha and Ottawa. We have a National Historic Park at Keweenaw in Calumet and one National Battlefield Park, the River Raisin in Monroe. We also have one very special National Park, Isle

Michigan’s second, yet only, National Park2021-04-08T14:30:50-04:00

The first king of the horseless carriage in Detroit

Michigan has long been known as the automotive state. With innovators like Henry Ford and Ransom Olds, we are known around the world for our automobile manufacturing. One of the lesser-known entrepreneurs that played a role in Michigan's automotive history is an interesting man by the name of Charles Brady King. He was the first person to

The first king of the horseless carriage in Detroit2021-03-08T14:42:57-05:00

The turbulent triumphant life of the Queen of Soul

Aretha Franklin is one of the greatest American artists of all time. Her singing career covered six decades and reached millions of Americans. Nicknamed the Queen of Soul, she earned just about every award a singer-songwriter can win, and on January 21, 1987, she became the first female vocalist to be inducted into the Rock-and-Roll Hall of

The turbulent triumphant life of the Queen of Soul2021-01-14T16:55:32-05:00

Did the Civil War have a little drummer boy from Michigan?

Winters are not usually known for great battles, as historically, armies used the time to rest and regroup. That is not to say the cold and snowy weather hasn’t had a drastic effect on warfare. Who can deny the importance of Washington crossing the Delaware on December 25, 1776, when the ragged Continental Army defeated highly trained

Did the Civil War have a little drummer boy from Michigan?2020-12-30T20:16:26-05:00

Building railroads to build Michigan

The chugging and mournful sound of a train’s bellow can elicit feelings of contentment in your soul. Even today, when a train is used mainly to haul freight or for scenic, vintage rides, it is a hauntingly beautiful sight to behold. It has also created many a ferroequinologist (train enthusiast). The railroads have been integral in Michigan’s

Building railroads to build Michigan2020-10-01T18:11:39-04:00

The ‘Boy Governor’ who made Michigan a state

Stevens Mason wasn’t born in Michigan. He didn’t die in Michigan either, yet he is very well-known for being a true Michiganian, and his influence on our state is undeniable. Also known as the Boy Governor, Stevens was instrumental in Michigan gaining statehood. The month of September has quite a few important dates in our state, and

The ‘Boy Governor’ who made Michigan a state2020-09-02T17:51:12-04:00

Taking a glimpse into the past at Detroit’s Historic Fort Wayne

The year was 1841, and the United States faced another possible threat from Great Britain, the same nation from whom it had won freedom only 65 years ago, and who tried again to retake it 28 years prior. In August of this year, Congress appropriated hundreds of dollars to build a chain of forts from the East

Taking a glimpse into the past at Detroit’s Historic Fort Wayne2020-08-01T15:19:57-04:00

Legendary Dorothy Zehnder inducted into Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame

Once you meet Dorothy Zehnder, it’s hard to forget her. She may be a tad diminutive in stature, but she’s definitely not short on kindness, charm or energy. In fact, the 98-year young matriarch of the Zehnder family still works full time six days a week! She is the co-founder and co-owner of the Frankenmuth Bavarian Inn,

Legendary Dorothy Zehnder inducted into Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame2020-07-27T00:07:30-04:00

Examining the legacy of Selfridge Air Base

America’s Number One Hornet’s Nest. Home of Generals. Home of the MiG Killers. These are all nicknames for a historic military base in Michigan. The Selfridge Air National Guard Base, formerly known as Selfridge Field, has been an important training ground for our troops since World War I. Today, it hosts many of our nation’s military units,

Examining the legacy of Selfridge Air Base2020-07-02T11:13:42-04:00
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